Votes in local elections matter

Opinion+columnist+Brenna+Wolfe+discusses+the+importance+of+voting+in+local+elections+and+the+impact+it+has+on+students%2C+as+well+as+UNI+as+a+whole.
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Votes in local elections matter

Opinion columnist Brenna Wolfe discusses the importance of voting in local elections and the impact it has on students, as well as UNI as a whole.

Opinion columnist Brenna Wolfe discusses the importance of voting in local elections and the impact it has on students, as well as UNI as a whole.

STOCK PHOTO

Opinion columnist Brenna Wolfe discusses the importance of voting in local elections and the impact it has on students, as well as UNI as a whole.

STOCK PHOTO

STOCK PHOTO

Opinion columnist Brenna Wolfe discusses the importance of voting in local elections and the impact it has on students, as well as UNI as a whole.

BRENNA WOLFE, Opinion Columnist

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Voting matters at UNI. Not only is voting easy to do on our campus, but it is also really important. You are spending 4 plus years of your life in Cedar Falls, and therefore, local politics affects you! Are you upset about potholes or construction? Well, that is local politics, and who you vote for can make a difference when it comes to issues you care about.

State politics affect you and UNI! Our budget and your tuition are directly impacted by votes in the Iowa legislature.

Less people vote in midterms, and that means your vote carries further! For example, Senator Jeff Danielson won his re-election by 22 votes in 2008. Your vote matters!

Your vote is also influential in the federal congressional race. The Cook Political Report deemed Iowa’s first congressional district as having one of the highest youth influences in the country. That means that the youth in Northeast Iowa can determine the results of the race. That is a huge deal!

In order to vote, you must be registered to vote. If you have a valid Iowa ID, you can register to vote online on the Iowa DOT’s website, under “Iowa Electronic Voter Registration.”

Once you are registered to vote, you should vote! Early voting for the 2018 midterm elections starts on Monday, Oct. 8 and goes until Monday, Nov. 5. During this time, you can go to the Black Hawk County Courthouse and fill out a ballot at the Auditor’s Office. It might sound intimidating, but it is actually pretty quick and simple.

Another way to vote is through satellite voting. We will be having satellite voting on our campus throughout October. That means that you can stop by Maucker Union, the Redeker Center, and Schindler Education Center to cast a ballot. The process is super easy, and you will get an “I Voted” sticker! The days and times will be published soon, so keep a look out for them!

If you want to vote on Election Day, which is Tuesday, Nov. 6 from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., find your area and polling location below:

The Quarters, Hillcrest, Gold Falls Villa

  • United Church of Christ, 9204 University Avenue (Ward 2, Precinct 1)

Hillside-Jennings, ROTH

  • Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 4000 Hudson Rd (Ward 2, Precinct 2)

Campbell, Bender Hall, Dancer Hall, UNI-Dome area

  • UNI Bookstore, 1009 W 23rd St (Ward 3, Precinct 3)

College Hill Area, University Manor, Hidden Valley

  • Hearst Center, 304 Seerley Boulevard (Ward 4, Precinct 2)

Quads, Lawther, Panther Village

  • Gilchrist Hall, Dakota St (On-Campus) (Ward 4, Precinct 3)

If you do not live in any of the above areas, you can find your polling location on the Iowa Secretary of State website, on a page titled “Find Your Precinct/Polling Place.” Just search on Google for: “Iowa Find Your Precinct.”

If you are registered to vote, when you do go to vote, you will be asked to provide a government-issued driver license OR to sign an oath verifying identity. You do not need an ID if you are registered to vote and you have a right to a regular ballot.

When they check your ID, they are simply verifying the name on the ID matched the name you provided. They are not checking for your address, picture, or signature on your ID. Just the name.

If you have any questions or concerns about voting, please contact the Auditor’s Office at (319) 833-3002. They know the law inside and out, and they are there to help you.

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